Seasonal Tips

Mowing

Mower Height
2.5" - 3" throughout the year is recommended.  The last cut of the season should be made at 1.25", which will help reduce the chance of snow mold and matting.

When To Mow
Mow frequently, especially in the spring when growth is rapid.  Never cut more then one-third of the grass blade in any one mowing.  Try to avoid mowing in extreme wet or hot conditions.

Sharp Blades
Blades are often overlooked and not sharpened enough.  Blades should be sharpened several times during the growing season to create nice clean cuts.  This will help to maintain deep color longer and eliminate frayed grass blades.

Scalping
Scalping of the lawn (cutting the lawn severely too short) can lead to many problems for the lawn, and should be avoided.  Scalping can lead to thinning of turf, loss of color, and contribute to the buildup of crabgrass and broadleaf weeds.  Scalping a lawn during dry, hot conditions can also make the lawn appear to be "burned".

Watering

When To Water
The best time to water is in the early morning.  This will allow more water penetration and less evaporation than watering during the day.  Avoid watering in the evening as this will not allow proper drying time, which may contribute to disease build up.

How Much To Water
1" of water per week is ideal for established lawns.  One or two deep waterings per week is recommended to promote a healthier root zone.  Shallow watering promotes limited root systems.

Sprinkler Checkups
Sprinkler systems should be checked often to assure proper coverage and proper amounts are being applied.  Changing the length of running cycles to coincide with seasonal changes is recommended.

Warning Signs
How to tell when your lawn needs watering?  Lawns that are thirsty tend to show stress signs such as wilting, and color fade to yellow or off green.  Other signs are mower tracks or footprints remaining in the grass without rebounding upright.

Core Aeration

When to Aeration
Core aeration is a vital part of a lawn management program.  Aeration is beneficial to the lawn and is recommended every fall.  Aeration can also be done in the spring but is not recommended because it may break down crabgrass control barriers already in place.

Benefits of Aeration
• Thatch management increases activity of microorganisms needed to decompose thatch by bringing them from the soil to the surface.
• Relieves soil compaction which allows deeper water and nutrients penetration.
• Works well with overseeding by giving the seed a good growing environment.
• Encourages healthy root zone activity.

Tree & Shrub Pruning

When to Prune
Spring is the recommended time for pruning many types of plants.  Spring flowering plants should be pruned in winter or early spring before new growth appears.  Evergreens can be pruned anytime as long as the wood is not frozen.  Deciduous trees such as maples, dogwoods and elm should be pruned in early fall.  This will eliminate sap flow that will occur if pruned in the spring.

How to Prune
Always use very sharp pruning equipment that is large enough for the job.  This will keep bark from ripping and give nice, clean cuts.  Do not leave jagged edges and try to keep the branch collar in tact so heal over begins immediately.  Wound paint is not necessary on properly made pruning cuts.

Winter Stress

Desiccation
Desiccation, also known as "Winter Burn", is the process that occurs when leaves continue to lose water.  This process usually occurs when the soil is frozen or dry.  Younger plants and recent transplants are more prone to this condition.  Evergreens such as hollies, azaleas, and rhododendrons, in wide open exposed areas are also very prone to this condition.  Some symptoms of this condition include wilting of leaves, tip burn, leaf browning or blackening, leaf drop, or in severe cases death of branches or part of the plant.

Protection
• Mulching around plants at a 2" - 3" depth will help to retain soil moisture.
• Use burlap or other wind breaks where plants are in very exposed wind tunnels.
• Provide proper nutrients to the plant to keep them as healthy and vigorous as possible.  Root fertilization in the fall is ideal for this.
• Plant hardy trees and shrubs in areas desirable to their conditions.
• Prune injured or dead branches in spring.

Frost Damage
Frost damage can cause blackening, curling and leaf drop of leaves and twigs.  In severe cases, frost can result in sudden death of flowers, buds, or foliage.  In the spring after plants break dormancy, frost damage is often confused with spray damage by customers after an application.  Most damage caused by frost to hardy plants will recover.

Sun Scald
Sun scald occurs when plant tissue is frozen and the sun heats the tissue above the freezing mark.  When temperatures of the plant tissue drop below freezing again, sun scald can occur.  This usually occurs when this cycle is repeated over several days.  Symptoms of sun scald include bark splitting, leaves browning, or blackening, dieback or general plant decline.

What They Say

quote  "After a crazy Texas storm, I had 3 trees down in my front yard.  GCLS was able to save 1 of the trees and they removed the other 2 that were completely blown over."

- Josh Odegard, Dallas, TX

read more testimonials

Seasonal Tips

Mowing
Scalping
Scalping of the lawn (cutting the lawn severely too short) can lead to many problems for the lawn, and should be avoided.  Scalping can lead to thinning of turf, loss of color, and contribute to the buildup of crabgrass and broadleaf weeds.  Scalping a lawn during dry, hot conditions can also make the lawn appear to be "burned".

read more seasonal tips

Contact

Phone : 469-774-7240
contact us online
make an appointment

 

Hours

Mon - Fri  : 7am to 6pm Saturday : 8am to 4pm